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Analytical textile technologist

Analytical textile technologists produce technical textiles for industries like automotive and healthcare.

Salary, a pound sign Salary: £18,000 to £30,000 average per year
Hours, a clock face Hours: 37 per week

1. Entry requirements

You’ll usually need a degree in:

  • textiles technology
  • science
  • engineering
  • textile science and technology
  • materials science and engineering

If you have a non-textiles degree, a postgraduate qualification in textiles technology would be useful.

If you don’t have a degree, you could start at technician level and work your way up.

You’ll need colour-normal vision.

You could get into this job through an apprenticeship.

2. Skills required

You’ll need:

  • strong communication skills
  • the ability to lead a team
  • the ability to work to deadlines
  • the ability to produce accurate records and written reports

3. What you'll do

You’ll:

  • solve technical questions about the manufacturing process
  • check the quality of materials
  • investigate whether textiles are fit for the job
  • analyse faults, to decide if they’re due to manufacturing or being incorrectly used by the customer
  • make sure labels list the correct contents of the textile 

Your day-to-day duties might include:

  • working with customers, staff and suppliers
  • using analytical instruments and techniques, like microscopes and infrared technology, to test samples
  • looking at technical performance specifications
  • developing new analytical techniques
  • interpreting and reporting data
  • writing technical reports and cost estimates
  • dealing with health and safety issues

4. Salary

Starter: £18,000

Experienced: £22,000 to £25,000

Highly Experienced: £30,000 or more

You’ll usually work around 37 hours a week. If self-employed, your hours will depend on the amount of work you have and the deadlines you need to meet.

Most of your work will take place in a laboratory.

You may need to wear protective clothing for some tasks.

5. Working hours, patterns and environment

You’ll usually work around 37 hours a week. If self-employed, your hours will depend on the amount of work you have and the deadlines you need to meet.

Most of your work will take place in a laboratory.

You may need to wear protective clothing for some tasks.

6. Career path and progression

With experience, you could apply for jobs with more responsibility, like technical manager or production manager, or move into quality control. 

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Last updated: 09 December 2016