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Assistant immigration officer

Assistant immigration officers check that people have the right to visit or stay in the UK

Salary, a pound sign Salary: £16,000 to £18,500 average per year
Hours, a clock face Hours: 36 per week

1. Entry requirements

You’ll need to meet certain nationality rules to apply for this role. You’ll need to be:

  • a UK national
  • an EU or European Economic Area (EEA) national
  • another national with the right to live and work in the UK

You’ll also usually need to have lived in the UK for 5 years before applying.

The qualifications you'll need will depend on the role you're applying for, but you'll find it useful to have:

  • 5 GCSEs at grades 9 to 4 (A* to C) or equivalent, including English and maths
  • customer service skills

You’ll also need clearance from the Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS), and you'll need to pass a security check.

UK Visas and Immigration has more information about the work of an assistant immigration officer.

2. Skills required

You’ll need:

  • observation and communication skills
  • the ability to relate to people of all backgrounds and cultures
  • good judgement and the ability to apply rules fairly
  • the ability to stay calm in difficult situations
  • IT and report writing skills

3. What you'll do

You’ll be based at a UK airport or seaport, or at the Channel Tunnel. You’ll work closely with immigration officers and the police.

Your day-to-day duties may include:

  • checking passports and work permits
  • interviewing people entering the UK
  • taking fingerprints
  • helping immigration officers with surveillance work
  • arranging to remove people who are not allowed to stay in the UK
  • issuing forms and carrying out clerical work
  • dealing with airlines and shipping companies
  • handling telephone enquiries
 You must be prepared to work anywhere in the UK.

4. Salary

Starter: £16,500

Experienced: £18,500

There are extra allowances for working shifts and unsocial hours.

These figures are a guide.

5. Working hours, patterns and environment

You’ll work 36 hours a week, usually in a shift pattern that includes nights, weekends and public holidays.

You could work in an office, an airport arrivals hall or a port.

You might travel around the country if you’re carrying out surveillance.

6. Career path and progression

With experience, you could progress to immigration officer, and then on to higher management posts.

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Last updated: 14 September 2017