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Car manufacturing worker Car maker, assembly line worker, motor vehicle assembler

Car manufacturing workers build motor vehicles by assembling parts on a production line. 

Salary, a pound sign Salary: £11,500 to £22,000 average per year
Hours, a clock face Hours: 40 per week

1. Entry requirements

You may find it useful to have previous experience in production manufacturing, although many car makers offer in-house training.

You could get into this job through an apprenticeship with a car manufacturer.  Employers usually ask for 4 GCSEs at grades 9 to 4 (A* to C), including English and maths.

2. Skills required

You’ll need:

  • teamworking skills
  • close attention to detail
  • good time management
  • flexibility for shift work

3. What you'll do

Your duties will depend on which part of the production line you work on. You could be:

  • taking delivery of parts from suppliers
  • operating presses that shape metal sheets and components
  • fixing the engine and frame to the vehicle chassis
  • assembling other parts using robotic welders and hand tools
  • controlling paint spraying machinery
  • fitting interiors, wiring, lights, dashboards and windscreens
  • moving finished vehicles to storage areas ready for shipping
You’ll also carry out quality checks for faults at each stage of production, using digital readouts and manual inspections.

4. Salary

Starter: £11,500 to £15,500 (while training)

Experienced: £16,000 to £22,000

These figures are a guide.

5. Working hours, patterns and environment

You’ll usually work 40 hours on a shift pattern. This could include weekends and nights.

Overtime is often available.

6. Career path and progression

With experience and further training, you could become a team supervisor, quality control technician or workshop section leader. 

You could also train to work as a maintenance engineer, servicing and repairing the production line machinery.

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Last updated: 18 August 2017