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Construction manager Site manager

Construction managers organise the work on building projects, making sure that the work is completed safely, within budget and on time.

Salary, a pound sign Salary: £27,000 to £70,000 average per year
Hours, a clock face Hours: 40 to 50 per week

1. Entry requirements

You'll usually need a foundation degree, HND or degree accredited by the Chartered Institute of Building (CIOB) in a subject like:

  • building studies or building engineering
  • surveying or civil engineering
  • construction engineering
  • construction site management
  • estimating

You'll also usually need several years' work experience in the industry.

If you don't have a degree, you may be able to work your way up if you've got experience in a relevant construction job like surveyor or site supervisor.

You may be able to get into this role through a higher level apprenticeship.

Go Construct has more information on careers in the construction industry.

2. Skills required

You'll need:

  • leadership skills and the ability to motivate a team
  • problem-solving skills
  • decision-making skills
  • organisational and planning skills
  • maths and IT skills

3. What you'll do

You'll usually work for building companies and specialist subcontractors. You might also manage projects for local authorities, government departments, or utility and engineering firms.

Your day-to-day activities may include:

  • checking plans with architects, surveyors and engineers
  • hiring staff and buying materials
  • planning work schedules
  • monitoring building progress and costs
  • checking quality
  • reporting to clients
  • maintaining and promoting health and safety

You'll be the main point of contact for subcontractors and the public. As a senior manager you may need to oversee several projects at the same time.

4. Salary

Starter: £27,000 to £33,000

Experienced: £35,000 to £50,000

Highly Experienced: £70,000 or more (senior or chartered managers)

These figures are a guide.

5. Working hours, patterns and environment

You'll usually work standard office hours, Monday to Friday. You may need to work evenings or weekends to meet deadlines.

You'll spend time travelling between sites and meeting clients and contractors. You may need to travel long distances and stay away from home.

You'll work in all weather, and may also work at height. You'll wear protective clothing.

6. Career path and progression

With experience, you could progress into contract management or consultancy. With further training, you could move into support services like health and safety and building inspection.

You can improve your career prospects by getting chartered status, through an industry body like the The Chartered Institute of Building.

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Last updated: 12 April 2017