Health promotion specialist Health improvement specialist

Health promotion specialists educate and inform people about health issues.

Salary, a pound sign Salary: £22,000 to £41,250 average per year
Hours, a clock face Hours: 30 to 40 per week

1. Entry requirements

You’ll usually need:

  • experience of working with community groups
  • experience and qualifications in nursing, teaching or social work, or
  • a degree in a relevant subject like health studies, health promotion or public health, although a biological, social or behavioural science degree would also be useful

The Royal Society for Public Health (RSPH) and Health Careers have more information about becoming a health promotion specialist.

2. Skills required

You’ll need:

  • excellent communication skills
  • the ability to influence and motivate people
  • the ability to think creatively
  • project management skills
  • research and analytical skills

3. What you'll do

You’ll raise awareness of:

  • the importance eating healthily and taking regular exercise
  • the dangers of smoking or excessive drinking
  • the risk of coronary heart disease and cancers
  • mental health, sexual health, and drug misuse

You might work:

  • with other health professionals, like doctors, nurses and health trainers
  • with people on a one-to-one basis
  • with specific groups, like older people or people with disabilities
  • at schools, workplaces or prisons

You may also be involved in:

  • working on public health campaigns
  • working with local, regional and national policy makers
  • research
  • producing publicity materials
  • organising exhibitions and events
  • running training courses and workshops
  • providing information and advice to managers in health authorities and local councils

4. Salary

Starter: £22,000 to £28,500

Experienced: £31,250 to £36,000

Highly Experienced: £41,250

These figures are a guide.

5. Working hours, patterns and environment

You’ll usually work Monday to Friday, 9am to 5pm, although you might also run sessions in the evenings and at weekends.

You’ll be office based, but you’ll also work in the community and travel to health centres, hospitals, offices and sports centres.

6. Career path and progression

With experience, you could move into a more senior role and have more responsibility for planning projects and strategies.

If you have a postgraduate qualification, you could move into a role where you’ll have responsibility for managing projects and other health promotion specialists.

You could also work as a freelance consultant.

Last updated: 05 October 2016