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IT support technician IT user support technician, IT helpdesk technician, service desk technician, help desk support analyst

IT technical support staff diagnose and solve software and hardware problems for computer users.

Salary, a pound sign Salary: £16,000 to £35,000 average per year
Hours, a clock face Hours: 35 to 40 per week

1. Entry requirements

There are no set requirements, but you’ll need a good level of general education. You'll also need a working knowledge of computer software and hardware.

A college course in computing or IT support, and experience in customer service, will help.

You could get into this job through an apprenticeship.

If you work with young people or vulnerable adults, you’ll need clearance from the Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS).

2. Skills required

You'll need:

  • excellent customer service skills
  • the ability to explain technical issues to non-technical users
  • analysis and problem-solving skills
  • the ability to prioritise and manage tasks

3. What you'll do

You may work in-house with an organisation’s staff, students or customers. You may also work in a call centre advising the public by phone, email or online chat.

In some roles, you’ll be responsible for telephony and audio-visual equipment as well as IT systems.

Your day-to-day tasks may include:

  • communicating with computer users to find and fix problems
  • tracking work in progress and recording issues and solutions
  • updating online knowledge banks
  • servicing and fixing equipment, including printers, projectors and networks
  • setting up new equipment and upgrading existing systems
  • training people on new systems, face-to-face and online

4. Salary

Starter: £16,000 to £22,000

Experienced: £22,000 to £24,000

Highly Experienced: £25,000 to £35,000

These figures are a guide.

5. Working hours, patterns and environment

You'll usually work 35 to 40 hours a week. You may have to work shifts, including evenings and weekends.

You'll work in an office and spend a lot of your time at a computer.

You may have to travel to different sites to help users. A driving licence may be required.

6. Career path and progression

With experience, you could move into a supervisory or management role.

With training, you could move into network engineering, database administration, business or systems analysis, IT security, IT project management, training or technical sales.

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Last updated: 13 September 2017